people are very nervous

Last week, the Justice Department fined Toyota $1.2 billion for covering up a sudden-acceleration problem that has spawned more than 400 lawsuits.Meanwhile, GM is facing multiple federal investigations into an ignition-switch problem that has contributed to at least 31 accidents and 12 deaths since surfacing more than a decade ago.In both cases, the problems turned out to be basic and mechanical.But federal safety investigations into the defects were complicated by the millions of lines of computer code and advanced electronics that are already standard equipment.Her department hasn’t fully staffed, she’s in the middle of on-boarding a new hireĀ Titanium Pipe, she’s a novice PPC manager and has not had the resources to create custom landing pages for her campaigns.”The reality is that the vast, vast majority of accidents are caused by human error and computers are going to dramatically improve on people’s driving,” said Joshua Schank, president and chief executive of the Eno Center for Transportation, a research organization that has studied the challenges posed by autonomous cars.
But “people are very nervous about the idea that computers could go haywire and cause us to die.””Cars are meant to be driven by people, not machines,” said Joan Claybrook, a consumer advocate and former NHTSA administrator.”I have enough trouble trusting my computer, much less a computer to drive my car.”Last week, the Justice Department fined Toyota $1.2 billion for covering up a sudden-acceleration problem that has spawned more than 400 lawsuits.Meanwhile, GM is facing multiple federal investigations into an ignition-switch problem that has contributed to at least 31 accidents and 12 deaths since surfacing more than a decade ago.In both cases, the problems turned out to be basic and mechanical.But federal safety investigations into the defects were complicated by the millions of lines of computer code and advanced electronics that are already standard equipment.